Fresh Seafood

The city of Oso, WA and all the mudslide victims are in our thoughts and well-wishes.

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  • Author: Dean Zulich, NWBiH.com   2006-02-01

    Seattle's Pike Place Market has been open now for almost a century, and in that time it has become one of the most treasured cultural institutions in the state of Washington.

    In the center is Walter, of Pure Food and Fish, a stand that turns fifty this year. The owner Sol Amon has been at the market since 1931. In his late eighties, he is still peddling fish, and is not planning on retiring for at least another ten years.

    Harry Calvo, in the foreground, returned from Vietnam in 1967, looking for a summer job at the Pike Place Market. Also known as “Cal Ripken of the Market”, Calvo is still a favorite of the passing crowds at Pure Food Fish, famous for his smile and “that goofy ‘aw shucks’ look”.

    In 1911, Jack Amon came to America and began selling fine seafood from a stand in Seattle's world-famous Pike Place Public Market. This family business, Pure Food Fish, is still a single long counter in the Pike Place Market run by Jack's first son, Sol.

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  • Sunday, June 3, 2007 - 12:00 AM
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    Supporters of returning the Market to local control rally in 1990 against New York investors called The Urban Group, which was threatening a takeover. The following year, enough public and private money was raised to buy out the New Yorkers.

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  • Pike Place Market turns 100

    Posted on October 12, 2012 in Featured In

    03:31 PM PDT on Friday, May 11, 2007
    By ALLEN SCHAUFFLER / KING 5 News

    Nobody has been in business at the market longer than Sol Amon.
    "In this location 51 years," says Amon.  "I bought this market in 1956 with my dad."

    Video

    Sights, sounds of Pike Place Market

    The man behind Pure Food Fish has so much fun he can barely call this work and has more than half a century here.

    "This is the best the market's ever been right now," said Amon.

    We all know the things that make Pike Place Pike Place Market: the sidewalk musicians, the flying salmon, the flowers, the produce, the original Starbucks, that iconic sign and the superstar bronze pig named Rachel, the hustle and bustle of commerce and community that has been a fixture downtown since onion prices soared out of sight in 1907 and civic leaders invited farmers to the corner of First and Pike to sell produce direct to city folk.

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  • Good Earth, Good Water

    Posted on October 12, 2012 in Featured In

    For the discriminating foodie, three shopping meccas by Ronald Holden

    A fundamental truth underlies everything about food: unless you grow it, raise it or catch it yourself, you need a marketplace in which to find it. Even if you bake your own bread, you still need to buy flour; if you raise tomatoes in the backyard or a pot of herbs on the windowsill, you still need to buy salt and pepper.

    One of the reasons Seattle has become such a great food community is its abundance of raw materials: seafood, mushrooms, fruit, clean water. Add to that the hardworking farmers, fishermen and foragers, and the well-established networks for getting the ingredients of their goodness into the hands of buyers. In short: we've become a city of great marketplaces.

    We'll look at traditional, small-scale farmers' markets in upcoming issues. For a start, though, a stroll through three of Seattle's biggest and most colorful.

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  • Sunday, July 07, 2002, 12:00 a.m. Pacific
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    Job Market

    By Lisa Heyamoto
    Seattle Times business reporter

    Veteran vendor Sol Amon has seen a lot from behind the counter of his fish shop at the Pike Place Market.

    He’s seen the days when he had to have ice hauled in to keep his fish fresh, the days before ice was made by machine.

    He’s seen the Market nearly go under and rise again to unprecedented popularity. But mostly what he’s looking at now is a whole lot of tourists.

    It’s summertime, and the foot traffic is bumper to bumper as shoppers — window and otherwise — pack the market for a sample of its wares.

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  • Tuesday, April 11, 2006, 12:00 a.m. Pacific
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    By Erik Lacitis
    Seattle Times staff reporter

    DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

    Sol Amon dons the apron of Pure Food Fish Market, which he has operated for 50 years at Pike Place Market. Amon, who goes by "Solly," has become an institution at the Market and, at 76, has no plans to retire. "I need the business more than it needs me," he says.

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  • Pike Place Market News – April 2006

    From now until eternity, April 11 will officially be Sol Amon Day, throughout Seattle. Amon, celebrating 50 years as owner of the Pure Food and Fish, also the 2006 King of the Market, is commemorating Pure Food & Fish’s golden anniversary with ceremonious cake and balloons, at high noon, on April 11. The public is invited.

    To mark this special day, Amon (a.k.a. “The Cod Father”) is generously donating the day’s proceeds to the Market Foundation, to fund the Market’s Clinic, Senior Center, Food Bank and Preschool. Marlys Erickson, Foundation executive director, says Amon is as much of an icon in the Market and the Market is an icon of Seattle. His dad, Jack Amon, came to the Market in 1911 and ‘Solly’ has been here ever since. (Fish is so much a part of him his name is similar to salmon.)

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