Fresh Seafood

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  • Market lost & found

    Posted on October 12, 2012 in Featured In

    Monday, August 6, 2007 - 12:00 AM
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    By Stuart Eskenazi
    Seattle Times staff

    For every story told about Pike Place Market, countless go untold. Some have been lost over time and bear repeating. Others wait to be found.
    Here are a few nuggets from the lost-and-found files of the Market, which turns 100 on Aug. 17.

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  • Sunday, July 07, 2002, 12:00 a.m. Pacific
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    Job Market

    By Lisa Heyamoto
    Seattle Times business reporter

    Veteran vendor Sol Amon has seen a lot from behind the counter of his fish shop at the Pike Place Market.

    He’s seen the days when he had to have ice hauled in to keep his fish fresh, the days before ice was made by machine.

    He’s seen the Market nearly go under and rise again to unprecedented popularity. But mostly what he’s looking at now is a whole lot of tourists.

    It’s summertime, and the foot traffic is bumper to bumper as shoppers — window and otherwise — pack the market for a sample of its wares.

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  • Tuesday, April 11, 2006, 12:00 a.m. Pacific
    Permission to reprint or copy this article or photo, other than personal use, must be obtained from The Seattle Times. Call 206-464-3113 or e-mail resale@seattletimes.com with your request.

    By Erik Lacitis
    Seattle Times staff reporter

    DEAN RUTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

    Sol Amon dons the apron of Pure Food Fish Market, which he has operated for 50 years at Pike Place Market. Amon, who goes by "Solly," has become an institution at the Market and, at 76, has no plans to retire. "I need the business more than it needs me," he says.

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